You’ve become a homeowner….now what?

PRG wants to help you be a successful homeowner. That’s why we hosted our first-ever Home Maintenance workshop this summer.

Attended by over 20 households, this workshop featured information and tips from Project Manager Kevin Gulden about home maintenance and upkeep.  Held at one of our recently-completed homes in north Minneapolis, the 90-minute workshop was specially designed for first-time homebuyers. The presentation included information on winterizing, knowing where to find shut-off valves, changing furnace filters, and exterior maintenance.

Wish you could have been on the tour? Check oubanistert PRG’s monthly Home Tips blog: HomeTips

 

A well-stocked tool box is something no homeowner should be without. You’ll use it when you put together flat-packed furniture, tighten loose screws, hang pictures, or install shelving. You can buy off-the-shelf tool kits, but these are the six must-haves:

1) Hammer
Be sure to hold the hammer at its base and not in the middle for the most control. And be careful of your fingers!

2) Tape Measure
Whether you get a 10-foot or 25-foot, a tape measure will prevent you from buying a sofa that’s too big for your living room.

Tape measure

3) Screwdriver
This type will do, but even better than a set of screwdrivers (flat and Phillips), is one with exchangeable bits (like this one). You might also want to invest in an electric/cordless drill/screwdriver.

4) Wrenches
As a homeowner, you will put together countless chairs, devices, toys, and tools. A set of these hex (also called Allen) wrenches will help you get the job done. You’ll also need an adjustable wrench for bolts.

5) Needle-nose Pliers
Remove nails, tighten loose-fitting brackets, and rescue dropped jewelry from the tub drain.

6) Utility Knife
Use a sharp utility knife for opening boxes or breaking down cardboard for recycling. A basic one like this will do or you can invest in one with multiple blades.

“So much pertinent information crammed into one day! The speakers were all really engaging and knowledgeable.”

Home Stretch workbook

Anyone can search the MLS listings for houses for sale, so why take an all-day class just to learn about buying a home?

At PRG’s Home Stretch Homebuyer Workshop, you’ll learn all about the homebuying process and how to make the best decisions for your situation.

With guest speakers who are experts in the industry, a hands-on workbook you can keep, and knowledgeable facilitators, workshops include information on:

  • working with lenders
  • credit and budgeting
  • special loan programs
  • working with realtors
  • home inspections
  • what to expect at a closing
  • being a successful homeowner

In addition, PRG workshops meet HUD guidelines and are approved by NSP and Neighborhood LIFT, necessary to qualify for some types of down payment assistance and other programs.

“The class was so interesting and helpful! I wish I would have taken it two months ago before I started the process.”

Register now

“We’re saying thank you to one of the longest-running homeownership programs in the city of Minneapolis and one of the original members of the Homeownership Advisors Network: PRG, Inc.”

 

June is Homeownership Month! In recognition of that, the Minnesota Homeownership Center has highlighted a few partners including PRG. Erin and Mindy, two of our fabulous homeownership advisors, are interviewed in this great piece:

Homeownership Advisor Network Highlight: PRG, Inc.

Great job, Erin and Mindy! And thank you, MN HOC!

One of the great things about owning your home is the ability to plant a vegetable garden. Even though we’re into the warm days of June, you can still plant for a late summer or fall harvest.

  1. Choose a sunny spot in your yard
    Many vegetables require four to six hours of sun per day.
  2. Prepare the Soil
    Using a spade and a lot of careful bending at the knees, till the soil 6-12” deep. Add organic material such as compost or peat moss (available at garden centers and hardware stores) to the soil. You can also rent a tiller if you’re putting in a large garden.
  3. Choose the plants
    The University of Minnesota Extension Service lists ideal times for planting vegetables.
  4. Water regularly
  5. Add mulch
    New plants like mulch (wood chips, straw, leaves). It keeps the soil cool and prevents drying out.

A recent opinion piece in the Star Tribune (“Counterpoint: Public initiative, not private incentives, are need to improve north Minneapolis,” May 26, 2017) highlights the need for public initiative to level the playing field in Minneapolis.

North Minneapolis, in addition to enduring structural racism since the 1930s, has suffered through the predatory lending practices of the early 2000s and the devastating tornado in 2011. Disinvestment has compounded these issues for this community.

PRG work siteNeeraj Mehta, director of community programs at the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs at the University of Minnesota, cites PRG as an example of what can be done with city subsidies. Our James Avenue Cluster project is an example of strategic development that we believe has lasting impact.

Mehta states: “PRG’s infill development strategy achieved numerous racial-, social-, and economic-justice outcomes.”

PRG’s multi-family housing development, Spirit on Lake, was the final stop on a tour of affordable housing developments during National Housing Conference’s “Solutions for Housing Communications 2017” held in Minneapolis in late April. The conference is held annually and connects housing communications professionals, affordable housing developers, and advocates from across the country.

Tour group at Spirit on Lake

During the tour, PRG’s Executive Director Kathy Wetzel-Mastel spoke to the NHC group about the challenges and rewards developing Spirit on Lake, the first in the nation to serve the aging LGBTQ community. The affordable housing facility was completed in 2015 and is fully leased up. Located on Lake Street in Minneapolis, the property is also home to a growing immigrant community.

Quatrefoil Library at Spirit on Lake

Tour-goers also got a peek at the ground floor space belonging to Quatrefoil Library which collects and circulates gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer materials and information.

 

Spring is a great time to enjoy your home inside and out. With all the chores you could be doing, we compiled a list of what not to do.

Person on a ladderDon’t climb on the roof to inspect the condition of the shingles or chimney (safety first!). Some good binoculars or a secure ladder can help you see if you need to call in a professional to make repairs. Look for shingles that are damaged, curling or cupping at the edges, or missing granules.

Don’t use a high-pressure hose to clean your windows. This can damage the glass, weather-stripping, or caulking around the windows. It could also spray water into your house.

Don’t rake your grass too soon. This can pull the turf out by the roots. Wait until your lawn has dried enough that it doesn’t show footprints.

Don’t let weeds or shrubs crowd your house. Prune shrubs so they don’t touch your house or foundation and clear away any vegetation around your air conditioning unit to avoid blocking the air flow.

Don’t let downspouts get filled with debris. Clear away rotted leaves and make sure the spout is pointed away from the foundation.

Don’t depend on your dryer’s lint trap to catch all the debris. Built-up lint can be a fire hazard, so be sure to clean the dryer’s ducts and exterior vent.

Don’t plant grass seed. Early fall is the best time to plant seed, but if you have a bare yard, be sure to buy the correct type of seed and fertilizer. And if you didn’t have any weeds last year, don’t bother spraying in the spring.

On Thursday, March 16, 2017, President Trump released his proposed budget for the 2018 fiscal year. In addition to cuts that broadly impact social services, the arts, environment, agriculture, and education, the budget also includes a $6.2 billion cut to HUD (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development).

This proposed budget will have deep and lasting impacts on neighborhoods and families throughout the country. It would eliminate a variety of vital HUD programs including two that directly affect PRG’s work. The HOME Investment Partnerships Program supports our affordable housing development, and Section 4 Capacity Building for Community Development and Affordable Housing provides much-needed operating support for our housing programs.

As is often the case, these program cuts will disproportionately impact communities of color and low-income communities. PRG, a recipient of HUD funding, has always worked to improve neighborhoods and communities on the local level.

Last year, PRG:

  • Provided free foreclosure prevention counseling to 50 families, helping 73% of these avoid foreclosure
  • Prepared 360 households for first-time homeownership with homebuyer education workshops
  • Awarded 88% of our construction contracts to minority-owned businesses, impacting the local economy
  • Sold 90% of PRG-developed homes to households of color

To continue doing this important work, we need your help to spread the word about the importance of protecting critical resources for affordable housing.

What you can do:

  • Contact your elected representatives. Call or send postcards. Find contact information for:
  • Donate to PRG. From $5 to $500, your tax-deductible gift in any amount helps.
  • Share your PRG story. Tell us how PRG has impacted you, your neighborhood, or your community.
    • What did you learn at HomeStretch?
    • Do you live in a PRG-developed home? Can you share a picture of your house?
    • Has Mindy or Thandisizwe or Erin helped you on your journey?
  • Let your voice be heard.
PRG original founders

Some of the original PRG founders

As PRG closed out its 40th anniversary year, we hosted an open house on Thursday, Feb. 23. More than 75 people attended and many original founders and early board and staff members joined us. Founding PRG board member Hennepin County Commissioner Peter McLaughlin spoke about the importance of PRG’s legacy of supporting families through housing.

Other speakers at the event included Barbara Satin, Assistant Faith Work Director for The National LGBTQ Task Force; Dante Coleman, PRG homeowner and board member; and PRG’s own homeownership advisor Thandiswzwe Jackson-Nisan who performed poetry.

PRG-developed home on James Avenue

James Avenue home

While eating, drinking, and listening to the inspirational words of our speakers, attendees fell in love with the recently-completed home that was the site of the open house. The house on James Avenue North was built by PRG as part the Green Homes North Program and is one of eight built by PRG in the area over the past three years.

The 3-bedroom, 3-bathroom house is 1750 finished square feet. The house was designed by Jordan neighborhood resident Chic Hanssen (who was in attendance) and was built to Minnesota Green Communities
and Energy Star requirements.

Thanks to everyone who helped us celebrate our anniversary and for all the generous donations and support we’ve received throughout this past year. Here’s to another 40 years!

Have you been thinking about carpeting the living room or repaving the driveway? Making improvements to your home can increase its value and make your daily life more comfortable. But be wary of home improvement offers that seem “too good to be true.” Here are some tips for avoiding unethical or even illegal schemes.

1| Research the company
If you are approached with an offer of a great deal (such as by a door-to-door salesperson), take your time to research the firm.

2| Don’t fall prey to high-pressure sales tactics
Door-to-door scammers can really paint a dire picture of your home’s needs or insist on deals that “expire.” Take the time to shop around, compare, and research your options.

3| Confirm the company’s legitimacy
Under state law, door-to-door salespeople must present identification. Watch out for scammers that arrive in unmarked trucks or do not provide a physical address for their company.

4| Read offers and estimates carefully
Once you’ve received an estimate for a job, read it over carefully. Get more than one estimate for a project so you can compare the costs.
Under Minnesota’s Right to Cancel law, consumers have three days to cancel a contract made by a door-to-door solicitation.

5| Put your own safety first
Don’t invite door-to-door salespeople into your home. Scammers can be very aggressive and may refuse to leave until you’ve signed a contract. If you feel unsafe, it is not rude to say “no” and close the door. Listen to your instincts.
Report any suspected neighborhood scams to law enforcement.

Information based on: Minnesota Attorney General | Door-to-door Home Improvement Scams

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Don’t let water damage and plumbing bills get added to your list of winter woes!

Pipe Insulation example1) Insulate
Exposed pipes are susceptible to freezing. Wrap and insulate your pipes to protect them from cold temperatures. There are many options to choose from (including the one pictured) that can be found at any hardware or home supply store.

2) Adjust Thermostat
Even if you’ll be gone for an extended period (hopefully to Florida!), keep your thermostat set to at least 55 degrees. Even though water doesn’t freeze until it reaches 32 degrees, keeping your home any colder than 55 degrees puts you at risk of having frozen pipes.

3) Use Them
Pipes with moving water are less susceptible to freezing, so most of the time daily use prevents freezing. But if you have a bathroom or basement sink that rarely gets turned on, monitor it for water pressure and drainage. Also, although it may sound wasteful, letting a faucet drip can provide enough movement to prevent freezing. (A trickle the width of a pencil lead is sufficient and would result in water use that would cost about $2 a day.)

4) Open Cabinet Doors
Pipes confined under kitchen or bathroom cabinets don’t have access to the heat in the rest of the house and reach colder temperatures. Leaving the doors open to will allow heat to reach the pipes.

5) Locate the Water Shut-off Valve
Make sure you and others in your household know where the water main master shut-off valve is. If there is an incident (hopefully not!), shutting off the valve can help prevent extensive water damage.

Based on information from the City of Savage and U of MN Extension

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Scary BasementExposed pipes, spider webs, damp storage, cold concrete. Sound familiar? If this describes your unfinished basement, here are some tips to making the space more pleasant.

1) Organization and Storage
If your basement is like most people’s, the first step is organizing all the stuff down there.

  • Install or build shelves, making certain that things are off the floor. Metal shelving is best to prevent any moisture damage.
  • Because basements can be damp and there is always a risk of flooding, use tightly-closing plastic bins, not cardboard boxes that are susceptible to water damage.
  • Be sure to store paints, solvents, and other combustibles away from the furnace or water heater.
  • Toss anything broken or damaged. For unused items like old toys, furniture, or other household goods, consider donating.


2) Floors and Walls

The ubiquitous cinder block walls and concrete floors are the telltale sign of an unfinished basement.

  • Both walls and floors can be painted, but be sure to get paint specifically made for concrete flooring or cinder block and follow all m28anufacturer’s instructions.
  • Adding inexpensive area rugs (keeping in mind the risk of water damage) or hanging tapestries, fabric, or curtains can soften the look.

3) Ceilings and Lighting
Unfinished basements can be dark even in the middle of the day and feel creepy because of the exposed ceilings.

  • The advantage of the open ceiling is the ease of access to pipes and electrical, but you can paint the rafters and ceiling.
  • If you have bare bulbs, get some clip-on shades to hang upside down. Add some floor lamps to improve the lighting.

4) Stairs
Don’t forget the route down to the basement.

  • Make sure there is good lighting to increase safety.
  • Consider adding non-slip treads to the steps.
  • If you don’t have one, install a handrail that is securely anchored to the wall.

5) Ambiance and Air Quality
You don’t have to dread a trip to the basement.

  • Clean regularly to keep away the cobwebs and dust bunnies. Dust (using a broom with a rag on the end to reach into the rafters), vacuum, and mop.
  • Managing mildew and mold will improve the smell of the basement. Using a dehumidifier, especially in the summer, can help.
  • If you have more severe moisture issues, first address the cause of the water. Check out information about wet basements from the U of MN Extension Service.

Between the election and the unseasonably warm temperatures, November 2016 has been an interesting month. Despite (or perhaps because of) high emotions, people throughout Minnesota reached into their pockets and donated to nonprofits and schools during Give to the Max Day on November 17th.

Although the website for GiveMN.org crashed for a few hours (due to the overwhelming generosity of our state), PRG was still able to raise $6,080 and access a matching grant from the Kopp Family Foundation.

We still need to raise an additional $3,407 to reach our fundraising goal of $10,000 in individual donations for 2016—our 40th anniversary year. Making a gift is easy, fast, secure, and tax-deductible. Donate online via GiveMN or contact us.

Since 2012, the unremarkable, two-story house at 1816 Queen Avenue North had stood vacant. The drab building, owned by the City of Minneapolis, was an eyesore in the neighborhood. Originally built in 2002 as part of a failed for-profit development, the house lacked any curb appeal and didn’t have a garage.

1816 Queen Ave (before)

PRG purchased the property from the City of Minneapolis earlier this year and began renovation. Improvements include updated finishes and mechanical systems and the vital addition of a two-car garage.

By January, 2017, construction on the four bedroom, two bathroom house should be completed, and this HOW property will go on the market. The renovation of this house will not only improve the life of the family that buys it, its fresh new look will also improve the neighborhood.

1816 Queen Ave (after)

PRG has been renovating and building single-family homes since 1988. The changes are pretty dramatic!

Give

Explore the past 40  years of PRG by clicking the arrows to move through the timeline or use your mouse to zoom in and out.

Single family homeIn the early days, PRG’s primary activity was developing multi-family affordable housing. Starting with Whittier Cooperative, PRG did redevelopment work in Whittier, Powderhorn, and Phillips in south Minneapolis on projects including Arbor Commons, Oakland Square, and Prairie Oaks Townhomes.

PRG has a long legacy of responding to community need and so, in 1988, PRG expanded development to owner-occupied houses that would be affordable for families. These first single-family developments were primarily located in Phillips and Powderhorn.

Ten  years after beginning single-family developments, PRG looked beyond south Minneapolis to the north. According to the US Census, between 1990 and 2000 Minneapolis’ Jordan neighborhood lost 10% of its housing and the owner-occupied rate dropped 5% even while the amount of families with children in the area increased dramatically. Affordable, single-family housing was—and still is—needed to address these issues.

PRG’s first single-family homes in north Minneapolis were in Jordan, where we still have a strong presence today.

Give

At a time when an estimated 11.7 million people worldwide had died of AIDS, PRG partnered with the Minnesota American Indian AIDS Task Force (now called the Indigenous Peoples Task Force) on a 14-unit housing development for Native Americans living with HIV/AIDS. In 1997, with no cure or life-prolonging therapy yet developed, the life expectancy of those living with HIV/AIDS was around twenty years shorter than those without. Maynidoowahdak Odena

Mayindoowahdak Odena means “a place where ceremonies happen” in Ojibwe.

The project addressed the housing needs of HIV-positive Minnesotans, 44% of which had experienced homelessness. Previous housing projects for individuals with HIV/AIDS had not addressed the needs of the whole family and generally required patients to move away from their families. Mayindoowahdak Odena, located in Minneapolis’ Phillips neighborhood, allowed patients to live with their families, increasing stability. The affordable, permanent housing in a supportive, culturally-specific environment targeted low-income Native American individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS.

The design included a central ceremonial area echoing a traditional Native American village with community spaces. The MAIATF was also able to provide case management and support for residents. Maynidoowahdak Odena received the Design of the Year Award for Affordable Housing from the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency.

Give

As PRG celebrates our 40th anniversary, we got to thinking about the household chores we used to do…and the ones we still have.

then-Now

1980s single family homeAfter over ten years of developing multi-family housing in primarily Powderhorn Park neighborhood, PRG expanded in 1988 to single-family development. This expansion was a logical next step for an organization whose goal was to make decent, affordable housing available to low and moderate income residents and giving these residents great control over their housing and neighborhoods.

PRG began with two single-family homes in Phillips and within ten years had expanded single-family developments to north Minneapolis’ Jordan neighborhood. We have built or rehabbed almost 200 homes since 1988.

Affordable, single-family housing development continues to be a cornerstone of our work today. Today, Governor Dayton announced $80 million in investments in affordable housing across the state, and PRG is one of 11 awardees for single-family development in Minneapolis.

Give

Demo of what would become Linden PlaceIn 1990, the corner of 32nd and Bloomington in South Minneapolis was well-known to law enforcement. Some described the block of fourplexes as a “mini-slum,” and the area had been the site of violence, illegal activity, and drive-by shootings.

So when PRG partnered with concerned neighbors to rehab the lot, area residents were enthralled by the demolition of the property.

What was built in its place were 12 two-bedroom units, each available to low-income families. The Linden Place project helped to revitalize the surrounding neighborhood by decreasing the density (from 100 to approximately 36), increasing green space and trees, and the addition of yards for children to play in.

In 1991, Linden Place was a finalist for a CUE (Committee on Urban Environment) Award in the Making Our Neighborhoods Better Places category.

Give

Articles of IncorporationIn 1976, a group of concerned residents of the Powderhorn Park neighborhood formed a nonprofit in response to the economic hardship of the area. Here, reproduced in all its Xeroxed glory, is the original Articles of Incorporation for PRG.

The organization was founded with the intent of making decent, affordable housing available to low and moderate income residents. The  1976 mission and goals of Powderhorn Residents Group (as it was then known) were:

  • Safe, decent, affordable housing for low and moderate income people
  • Provide homeownership/resident control opportunities
  • Provide family housing opportunities

Now, 40 years later, our vision and mission are similar. We combine community-based affordable housing development with education and counseling to help all people and neighborhoods thrive.

As we look back at the past four decades of PRG, please help us continue doing this work for another 40 years by donating to PRG on Give to the Max Day on November 17, 2016.

Give

Laying the foundation for stronger neighborhoods and families for 40 yearsFrom Powderhorn to Jordan, from Native American communities to Cambodian refugee housing, from architectural awards to expansion of services, PRG has been part of the community in the Twin Cities for 40 years.

In celebration of our 40th anniversary, PRG has set a goal to raise $10,000 on Give to the Max Day, Minnesota’s annual day of giving. In the ramp-up to Give to the Max Day on November 17, we will be sharing tidbits of history and the impact of PRG over the years.

#40daysofPRGWatch for #40DaysofPRG on FacebookTwitter, and on the 40th Anniversary blog beginning October 7, and ending on Give to the Max Day on November 17, 2016.

And be sure to support PRG on Give to the Max Day!

Whittier School in Black and White

Whittier School building

Shortly after its founding in 1976, PRG began to explore options for purchasing multi-family housing for rehab. PRG worked with the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency (MHFA) to secure funding, and eventually purchased Whittier School, a Minneapolis Public Schools building that was slated to be demolished.

The Whittier Cooperative Apartments (Section 8 housing) was completed by 1980, a successful first housing development for PRG.

 

Give

If you have children, September means new schedules, lunches to pack, homework to do. But it can also be the perfect opportunity to get kids (back) into the habit of helping around the house. From preschoolers to teenagers, every child can pitch in with age-appropriate chores. Just don’t expect perfection and don’t use chores as punishments.

Preschoolers

Feed the pets
Help clear the table
Learn to dust
Make the bed
Put toys away

5-8 years

Help unload dishwasher
Pick up around the house
Set the table
Sort dirty laundry
Sort the recylcingHousehold chores
Sweep the floor
Take out the garbage
Water plants

9-11 years

Load dishwasher
Rake leaves
Replace the toilet paper roll
Vacuum
Wash windows and mirrors
Weed garden

Teenagers

Clean bathroom
Clean the refrigerator
Laundry
Mow the lawn
Shovel snow
Simple household repairs (changing light bulbs, painting, patching)

Based in part on information from Psychology Today

As the state’s second largest recipient of funds to provide pre-purchase counseling and homebuyer education, PRG helps to turn prospective buyers into home owners and to address the racial home ownership gap. A recent survey of PRG clients tells us more about the impact of our work in these services.

According to the survey, an estimated 300 households of color purchased homes after using PRG’s pre-purchase counseling and homebuyer education services over the past three years. This is important because for most middle-income Americans, their home is their primary asset, and access to home ownership allows households to build wealth.

PRG houseIn Minnesota, where the racial home ownership gap is one of the worst in the nation (the overall home ownership rate is 70%, but for households of color, the rate is 41%), housing counseling and education helps buyers overcome barriers (such as first generation and first time home buyers, buyers in neighborhoods disproportionately affected by the foreclosure crisis) that often represent systemic racial inequities. When combined with the fact that 73% of PRG-developed homes are purchased by households of color, we are making a real dent in the home ownership gap.

If you’ve purchased a home, you know how bumpy the road to home ownership can be, and PRG’s housing-related services help people dreaming of home ownership navigate the complexities of home buying.

This home is being developed in partnership with Midtown Phillips Neighborhood Association.exterior siding going up Interior in progress  garage  Interior in progress

I tell people, if you want a house, you got to go see Erin

If you’ve been dreaming of owning a home, there are lots of reasons to schedule a free appointment for pre-purchase homebuyer counseling.

One of our PRG home ownership advisors can:

  1. Confidentially review your finances
    With the help of an advisor, you will be able to think about your financial goals and what it will take to get there.
  2. Access your credit report and help you make sense of it
    If you do not have a recent credit report, PRG can provide a copy of your FICO report with all three scores ($19.90 per adult). You can also get a copy of your credit report online (without scores) for free at https://www.annualcreditreport.com.
  3. Look at your monthly income and expenses and help you determine what you can afford
    Our advisors will send you a monthly budget worksheet to help you figure out where your money goes in and out.
  4. Assess whether you qualify for a mortgage
    Your advisor will help determine if you qualify for any type of mortgage assistance or other programs that will help you purchase a home. She will also help you avoid predatory lenders.
  5. Recommend financial coaching if you’re not quite ready for home ownership
    If you need, our advisors can facilitate regular, long-term financial coaching (for free) that will help you build wealth and prepare for achieving your financial goals.

Sticky summer heat means that air conditioning units get a workout. Be smart about your energy use to save money (and maybe save the planet, too!).

1 | Close doors and windows
Everyone knows you should close your windows when you switch on the A/C, but did you ever think to cool a single room? Save energy by air conditioning just the room you’re using. For example, at night you may want to cool only the bedroom.

2 | Put on some shades
Covering windows with blinds or curtains during the day keeps the heat of the sun from warming your house.

3 | Have a BBQ
Don't cook inside!On hot summer days, keep the heat outside by cooking on the grill. If you want to cook inside, stick to the stovetop or microwave (not the oven).

4 | Take advantage of nighttime breezes
On cooler summer nights, turn off the A/C and get free air conditioning by placing fans in windows to circulate air. Tight-fitting box-style fans are more efficient, but any fan can help circulate air.

5 | Install a programmable thermostat
Although a programmable thermostat has an up-front cost, being able to program temperatures for times when you’re away saves money in both summer and winter. In the summer, set the temperature for 78 degrees when you’re gone.

6 | Tune it up
Make sure your central air conditioning unit is working as efficiently as possible by scheduling a tune-up. And get out the vacuum to keep the vents clean, too.

7 | Cash in on a rebate
If you don’t already have one, this week’s heat may have you considering the purchase of a whole-house central air conditioning unit. Check out whether you qualify for a rebate on a high-efficiency model. For example, Xcel Energy offers rebates on some models.

Information based on: Energy.gov and MN Energy Challenge

  • PRG has impacted my life in so many ways that its hard to find a place to start.

    Regina, Past Co-op Resident
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